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Garcia Dellacasa, Manuel (2023) 'Residential Segregation and Women's Labor Force Participation: The Case of Santiago de Chile.' Feminist Economics, 29 (2). pp. 96-128.

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Abstract

Women’s labor market participation in Chile ranks among the lowest in Latin America. In a country where over 90 percent of the population lives in segregated cities, where employment opportunities cluster in affluent neighborhoods, residential sorting has surprisingly been neglected as an explanatory factor. This article addresses this omission by calculating the effects of residential segregation on labor market participation among less-educated caregivers. Using an OLS fixed effects model, the study finds that segregation entails adverse spatial mismatch effects on labor market participation. No other sub-population is affected in this manner. Hence, residential segregation contributes to the consolidation of three types of inequalities. First, it reproduces gendered inequalities within less-educated households. Second, in the context of increasing labor market participation among more-educated women, residential segregation further increases inequalities between low-income and affluent households. Finally, it deepens geographical inequalities between marginalized and non-marginalized households.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Labor Economics, Feminist Economics, Spatial Mismatch, Latin America
SOAS Departments & Centres: Departments and Subunits > Department of Economics
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
ISSN: 13545701
Copyright Statement: This is the version of the article accepted for publication in Feminist Economics, 29 (2). pp. 96-128 (2023), published by Taylor and Francis. Re-use is subject to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
DOI (Digital Object Identifier): https://doi.org/10.1080/13545701.2022.2157856
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2023 09:08
URI: https://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/40660
Related URLs: https://www.tan ... 01.2022.2157856 (Publisher URL)

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