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Clark, Phil (2019) 'The International Criminal Court in Africa and the Politics of International Justice.' In: Thompson, William R., (ed.), Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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Abstract

The International Criminal Court (ICC) has generated considerable controversy since it came into force in 2002, principally because of its overriding focus on African conflict situations and suspects. This has led to accusations that the ICC is a neocolonial meddler in African affairs, wielding undue and unaccountable influence over the domestic political arena. Drawing on the author’s field research in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo since 2006 this article contends that the neocolonialism critique of the ICC exaggerates the power of the Court while underestimating the capacity of African states to use the ICC to their own ends. Delivering distanced justice from The Hague with limited expertise on African societies and spending scant time in the field, the ICC has failed to grapple sufficiently with complex political dynamics “on the ground.” Combined with the Court’s heavy reliance on state cooperation, these factors have enabled African governments to use the ICC to target their political and military enemies while protecting themselves from prosecution. This has also emboldened African states in continuing to commit atrocity crimes against civilians, especially during periods of mass conflict and fraught national elections. While claiming to hover above the political fray, the ICC has become heavily politicized and instrumentalized by African states, with lasting and damaging consequences for the practice of national politics across Africa. To avoid being willfully used by African governments, the ICC must bolster its political expertise and become politically savvier. Rather than claiming to be neutral while hovering above the domestic terrain, the ICC must embrace its inherently political nature and deliver justice in a way that improves rather than undermines the practice of national and community-level politics across Africa.

Item Type: Book Chapters
Keywords: International Criminal Court, Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, international justice, neocolonialism, state referrals, state cooperation, extraversion, African politics
SOAS Departments & Centres: Departments and Subunits > Department of Politics & International Studies
ISBN: 9780190228637
DOI (Digital Object Identifier): https://doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.724
Date Deposited: 04 Mar 2023 11:09
URI: https://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/39042

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