SOAS Research Online

A Free Database of the Latest Research by SOAS Academics and PhD Students

[skip to content]

Jaspars, Susanne (2020) 'Protracted crisis, food security and the fantasy of resilience in Sudan.' Security Dialogue. (Forthcoming)

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 (CC BY-ND 4.0).

Download (138kB) | Preview

Abstract

In the past decade, food security and nutrition practices have become central in the promotion of resilience in protracted crises. Such approaches have been welcomed by the aid community because of their potential for linking relief and development. Social and political analysts, however, have criticized resilience approaches for failing to consider power relations and because they entail an acceptance of crisis or repeated risk. In this context, regimes of food security and nutrition practices have become increasingly targeted, privatized and medicalized, focussing on individual behaviour and responsibility rather than responsibility of the state or international actors. This article uses examples from Sudan to examine how and why the resilience ‘regime of practices’ has functioned as a form of neoliberal governmentality, and argues that it has created a fantasy in which conflict in Darfur is invisible. This allowed food aid to be withdrawn and removed the need for protection despite ongoing conflict and threats to livelihoods; thus crisis-affected populations have been abandoned.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Conflict, food security, governmentality, medicalization, resilience, Sudan
SOAS Departments & Centres: Departments and Subunits > Department of Anthropology & Sociology
Subjects: J Political Science
ISSN: 09670106
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s) 2020
DOI (Digital Object Identifier): https://doi.org/10.1177/0967010620927279
Date Deposited: 25 Oct 2020 10:03
URI: https://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/34169

Altmetric Data

Statistics

Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
24Downloads
28Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months

Repository staff only

Edit Item Edit Item