SOAS Research Online

A Free Database of the Latest Research by SOAS Academics and PhD Students

[skip to content]

Kanganja, Joshua Lawson (1981) Courts and Judges in Zambia; the Evolution of the Modern Judicial System. PhD thesis. SOAS University of London. DOI: https://doi.org/10.25501/SOAS.00034110

[img]
Preview
PDF - Submitted Version
Download (269MB) | Preview

Abstract

This study examines the evolution of the modern judicial system in Zambia (formerly Northern Rhodesia). The work consists of twelve Chapters and is divided into three parts. Part I consists of two Chapters (Chapters 1 and 2) and discusses the contemporary judicial system of Zambia and the sources of the laws applied by the courts. Chapter 1 discusses the superior courts of Zambia whereas Chapter 2 discusses the various types of inferior courts and the sources of the laws applied by the courts. Part II consists of four Chapters (Chapters 3-6) and discusses the judicial system when the country was administered by the British South Africa Company in the period 1891 - 1924. Chapter 3 discusses the establishment of rule over Northern Rhodesia by the Company, the terms of the Company's Charter of Incorporation, the establishment of Consular Courts and the division of the country into Barotziland-North-Western Rhodesia and North- Eastern Rhodesia. Chapter 4 discusses the judicial system in North-Eastern Rhodesia in the period 1900-1910. Chapter 5 discusses the judicial system in Barotziland- North-Western Rhodesia in the period 1900-1910. Chapter 6 discusses the amalgamation of Barotziland-North- Western Rhodesia and Morth-Western Rhodesia and the unification of the judicial system. Part III consists of five Chapters (Chapters 7 - 11) and discusses the judicial system when the country was administered directly by the British Government in the period 1924-1964. Chapter 7 discusses the various Courts of Appeal which heard appeals from the High Court of Northern Rhodesia. Chapter 8 discusses the High Court of Northern Rhodesia. Chapter 9 discusses the Subordinate Courts system and Chapters 10 and 11 discuss the Native Courts system. Chapter 12 is the concluding Chapter. Basically, the study is descriptive and analytical in nature and highlights the salient features of the judicial system under the various administrations. Particular attention is paid to the jurisdiction of the various courts and to how they were staffed.

Item Type: Theses (PhD)
SOAS Departments & Centres: SOAS Research Theses > Proquest
DOI (Digital Object Identifier): https://doi.org/10.25501/SOAS.00034110
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2020 17:38
URI: https://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/34110

Altmetric Data

Statistics

Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
13Downloads
62Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months

Repository staff only

Edit Item Edit Item