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Hamzić, Vanja (2012) Rethinking Crime in Islamic Legal Tradition. In: Crime, Justice and Society, November 2012, City University London. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

This paper offers a critical historical overview of the varying concepts of crime in Islamic legal tradition, focusing on the four examples from the classical, postclassical and the contemporary eras of Islamic law. The first example presents a brief reevaluation of some contentious intersections between Islamic criminal law and the state governance (siyasa) in the Great Seljuk Empire (1040-1194 CE). The second example relates to the role of the Ottoman sultanic laws (kanun) (ca. 1453-1839 CA) in defining crime from an Islamic perspective. The third example addresses the adultery (zina) laws in Pakistan (since 1979 CE), while the fourth example turns to feminist and sexual/gender-pluralist hermeneutics in the contemporary Islamic legal thought. The paper introduces a rich, pluralist landscape of the historical and present-day Islamic criminal legal theory, arguing for a novel, vernacular assessment of the changing concepts of crime in Muslim societies.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Items (Paper)
Keywords: Islamic Law, Islamic Legal Tradition, Islamic Criminal Law, Crime, Seljuq Empire, Ottoman Empire, Islamic Feminism
SOAS Departments & Centres: Legacy Departments > Faculty of Law and Social Sciences > School of Law
School Research Centres > Centre of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law
Departments and Subunits > School of Law
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General)
K Law > KB Religious Law in General > KBP Islamic Law
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2013 08:50
URI: http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/16984

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