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Party Candidate Selection before and after the Change of Ruling Parties: A Study of the 2005 and 2009 Local Executive Elections in Taiwan

Fell, Dafydd and Sullivan, Jonathan and Sapir, Eliyahu (2013) 'Party Candidate Selection before and after the Change of Ruling Parties: A Study of the 2005 and 2009 Local Executive Elections in Taiwan.' Taiwan Journal of Democracy, 9 (2). pp. 55-77.

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Abstract

This study examines how Taiwan’s parties conducted candidate selection in the 2005 and 2009 local executive elections and the consequences of these processes. It has adopted standard methods for measuring candidate selection and applied them to Taiwanese parties. It shows that, although both major parties employed very similar inclusive nomination methods in 2005, they diverged four years later, with the Democratic Progressive Party using a highly centralized candidate selection mechanism. We challenge the assumption that primaries undermine election campaigns and instead argue that, when the party allows the formal nomination process to take place, its candidates gain legitimacy and perform well. In general, primaries appear to promote local party unity and help to avoid the rise of rebel candidates. Nomination timing appears to have an effect on electoral outcomes in our sample cases, a finding that has not been addressed in the existing literature.

Item Type: Articles
SOAS Departments & Centres: Faculty of Law and Social Sciences > Department of Politics and International Studies
Faculty of Law and Social Sciences > Centre of Taiwan Studies
Subjects: J Political Science > JQ Political institutions (Asia, Africa, Australia)
Depositing User: Dafydd Fell
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2014 09:33
URI: http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/17883

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