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Protestant Medical Missionaries and the Fall of Hankou

Chatterton, Jocelyn (2011) 'Protestant Medical Missionaries and the Fall of Hankou.' Institute for Chinese Studies, Oxford. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

On October 28th 1938 Japanese troops entered north eastern Hankou and the following day 26 vessels of the Japanese army arrived in the city. The Japanese immediately requisitioned all rickshaws and coolies with the result that cheap and convenient transportation around the city disappeared overnight. Bishop Gilman resorted to using a Cathedral tea trolley to transport reserve supplies to the American Church Mission Hospital. Sentried barriers were erected [to demarcate military and civilian areas cutting off direct access to many parts of the city] and Consuls issued identity cards to all third party nationals. Thus began a nightmare period of confusion, fear and logistical difficulty that created unexpected religious and personal opportunity for the medical missionaries in Hankou.

Item Type: Other
Additional Information: Lecture, June 2011, Institute for Chinese Studies, Oxford as part of the "China's War with Japan" Programme.
Keywords: China history, Medical missionaries, Hankou, Wuhan, Sino-Japanese conflict, War of Resistance
SOAS Departments & Centres: Faculty of Languages and Cultures > Department of the Languages and Cultures of China and Inner Asia
Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Department of History
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DS Asia
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
U Military Science > U Military Science (General)
Depositing User: Jocelyn Chatterton
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2013 10:39
URI: http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/16918

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