SOAS Research Online

A Free Database of the Latest Research by SOAS Academics and PhD Students

[skip to content]

Janson, Marloes (2020) 'Crossing Borders: The Case of NASFAT or “Pentecostal Islam” in Southwest Nigeria.' Social Anthropology, 28 (2). pp. 418-433.

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 (CC BY-NC 4.0).

Download (196kB) | Preview
[img] Text - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Request a copy

Abstract

The Pentecostal movement in Nigeria, with its emphasis on this‐worldly blessings and healing, has become so vibrant that today even Muslim organisations appear to be increasingly ‘Pentecostalised’. Nasrul‐Lahi‐il Fathi Society of Nigeria or NASFAT is a case in point. In an effort to compete with Pentecostalism on Yorubaland‘s religious marketplace, NASFAT has copied Pentecostal prayer forms, such as the crusade and night vigil, while emphasising Muslim doctrine. As such, the case of NASFAT illustrates that religious borrowing does not imply that religious boundaries do not matter: indeed, NASFAT is a powerful example of the preservation of religious differences through the appropriation of Pentecostal styles and strategies. In this spirit, religiously plural movements such as NASFAT prompt us to unlock analytical space in the nearly hermetically sealed anthropologies of Islam and Christianity and to develop a comparative framework that overcomes essentialist notions of religious diversity.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: This is a journal article that is part of a special issue of Social Anthropology, entitled 'Religiosity and its Others: Lived Islam in West Africa and South India', co-edited by Ammara Maqsood, Leslie Feysenmeyer, and Giulia Liberatore. The issue will come out in Spring 2020. This is a revised version of a chapter in my forthcoming book.
Keywords: comparative religion, religious pluralism, Muslim-Christian relations, Islamic reform, Nigeria
SOAS Departments & Centres: Departments and Subunits > Department of Anthropology & Sociology
ISSN: 09640282
Copyright Statement: © 2020 The Author. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
DOI (Digital Object Identifier): https://doi.org/10.1111/1469-8676.12769
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2020 16:45
URI: https://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/32196
Funders: Other

Altmetric Data

Statistics

Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
24Downloads
47Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months

Repository staff only

Edit Item Edit Item