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Sound, memory and dis/placement: Exploring sound, song and performance as oral history in the southern African borderlands

Impey, Angela (2007) 'Sound, memory and dis/placement: Exploring sound, song and performance as oral history in the southern African borderlands.' Oral History Journal, 36 (1). pp. 33-44.

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Abstract

This paper draws on research conducted in the borderlands of South Africa, Mozambique and Swaziland. It proposes that sound, song and the affect of music-making represent a much under-utilised historical research resource, particularly in contexts of spatial and social rupture. Through the revitalisation of two traditional mouthbows and the jews harp – instruments once played by young Nguni women while walking, but remembered now by elderly women only – it explores music’s capacity to operate as both historical text and oral testimony, providing a focus for mobilising collective evocations of self and place, and aimed at raising the level of the voices of a community whose livelihood and sociality are at variance with broader socio-economic and environmental development processes in the region.

Item Type: Journal Articles
SOAS Departments & Centres: Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Department of Music
Depositing User: Users 1566 not found.
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2010 14:20
URI: http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/8261

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