[ skip to content ]

The state of Gujarat and the men without souls

Simpson, Edward (2006) 'The state of Gujarat and the men without souls.' Critique of Anthropology, 26 (3). pp. 331-348.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

In 2002, Gujarat, a state in the west of India, was home to one of the worst rounds of religious violence the country had seen for decades. The victims were mostly Muslims. In this paper, I argue, as others have done, that this violence was a product of the growing influence of a Hindu nationalist agenda at state and national levels. However, I also suggest that the violence emerged from the related patterns of neo-liberal reform which are radically altering the structures of society and governance in Gujarat. Economic and political liberalisation has created ambiguous zones between the state and society in which the possibility of religious violence has been incubated, sometimes deliberately, but by no means always so. To demonstrate how I arrived at this conclusion, I examine the creation of images of Muslims in Hindu society and how these images are recreated through the actions of Hindu nationalist organisations and the government. By doing so, I demonstrate how the organisations of Hindu nationalism have set about re-imagining the shape and purpose of the state. Furthermore, by isolating Muslims from economic resources and political representation, the organisations of Hindu nationalism enliven their own foundational myths, which state that the majority is in need of protection from the troublesome, isolationist and secretive minority.

Item Type: Articles
SOAS Departments & Centres: Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Depositing User: Edward Simpson
Date Deposited: 18 Apr 2008 14:21
URI: http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/4569

Statistics

Item downloaded times since 18 Apr 2008 14:21.

View statistics for "The state of Gujarat and the men without souls"

Repository staff only

View Item View Item