[ skip to content ]

Zhang Zi shige chuangzuo yu yuanlin yaqu. [Elegant Aspects of Zhang Zi [1153-1212+]'s Poetry and His Garden Activities]

Lo, Andrew (2005) 'Zhang Zi shige chuangzuo yu yuanlin yaqu. [Elegant Aspects of Zhang Zi [1153-1212+]'s Poetry and His Garden Activities].' In: Zhang, Tingjie, (ed.), Disanjie Songdai wenxue guoji yantaohui lunwenji. Yinchuan Shi: Ningxia renmin chubanshe, pp. 250-274.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Studies on the scholar-official Zhang Zi’s poetry are rare. This article discusses how he aimed to create a pure, leisured and elegant style in both his life and in his poetry. Section one introduces his illustrious family background, being a great- grandson of the famous general Zhang Jun. It also points out his main interests in life, writing poetry and enjoying his garden, Osmanthus Retreat. Section two discusses the affiliation of his poetic style to previous masters from the Tang and Song dynasties, including Yang Wanli and Lu You. From the number of seven character quatrains that he wrote, which cover over 43% of his extant poems, we can see his affiliation to Yang Wanli, who wrote half of his poems using the same poetic form. Section three discusses Zhang’s poems on the building of his garden. These illustrate the passionate efforts he put into this activity, and provide useful information on garden building in the Southern Song period. Section four discusses his enjoyment of his garden, and focuses on a close reading and analysis of a series of poetic exchanges on the osmanthus flower between himself and Yang Wanli. The discussion concludes that, despite his efforts, Zhang's compositions are not equal to those of Yang Wanli, who demonstrates a masterful gift for natural poetic expression. The section continues with Zhang’s poems on peonies, a flower which symbolises wealth and nobility, and discusses his view on how to express this ‘wealthy and noble’ state in poetry, and argues that he chose to combine the expression of purity and elegance within this same state. This argument is continued in section five, when we see that in hosting his grand entertainments in his garden, he also aimed to achieve this state of purity and elegance.

Item Type: Book Chapters
SOAS Departments & Centres: Faculty of Languages and Cultures > Department of the Languages and Cultures of China and Inner Asia
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PL Languages and literatures of Eastern Asia, Africa, Oceania
ISBN: 7227029697
Depositing User: Huei-Lan Liu
Date Deposited: 29 May 2008 13:19
URI: http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/id/eprint/3891

Repository staff only

View Item View Item